All posts by Scottish Tourist

Rannoch Moor.


Rannoch Moor is an expanse of boggy moorland to the west of Loch Rannoch, where it extends from and into westerly Perth and Kinross.
Rannoch Moor is designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Special Area of Conservation.

It is notable for its wildlife, and is particularly famous as being the sole British location for the Rannoch-rush, named after the moor.
It was frequently visited by Horace Donisthorpe who collected many unusual species of ants on the moor and surrounding hilly ground.
Today it is still one of the few remaining habitats for Formica exsecta, the “narrow-headed ant”, although recent surveys have failed to produce any sign of Formica pratensis,
which Donisthorpe recorded in the area in the early part of the 20th century.

Peat deposits pose major difficulties to builders of roads and railways.
When the West Highland Line was built across Rannoch Moor, its builders had to float the tracks on a mattress of tree roots, brushwood and thousands of tons of earth and ashes.
Corrour railway station, the UK’s highest, and one of its most remote being 10 miles from the nearest public road, is located on this section of the line at 1,339 feet.
The line takes gentle curves totalling 23 miles across the moorland. The A82 road crosses western Rannoch Moor on its way to Glen Coe and Fort William.

The desolate and isolated Gorton was a private railway station built near Meall a Ghortain that once housed a school for local railway workers children and still serves as the Gorton Crossing engineers siding.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot
@MacMurchiePipes
@ScottishTailor
@GolfScotland18

Scottish Tourist Event of the Year 2017.

Voting for the Scottish Tourist Event of the Year 2017 in now open.

Scottish Tourists and Visitors will be able to choose their winner from the shortlist of Scottish Events, which will be revealed on the Scottish Tourist website.

Best Scottish Tourist Event 2017

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot
@MacMurchiePipes
@ScottishTailor
@GolfScotland18

Sheriffmuir


The Battle of Sheriffmuir was an engagement in 1715 at the height of the Jacobite rising in England and Scotland.
The battlefield has been included in the Inventory of Historic Battlefields in Scotland and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009.
Sheriffmuir was and is a remote elevated plateau of heathland lying between Stirling and Auchterarder on the north fringe of the Ochil Hills.

John Erskine, 6th Earl of Mar, standard-bearer for the Jacobite cause in Scotland, mustered Highland chiefs, and on 6 September declared James Francis Edward Stuart (the “Old Pretender”) as King of Scots.
With an army of about 12,000 men Mar proceeded to take Perth, and commanded much of the northern Highlands.
Following unsuccessful skirmishes against John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll (based at Stirling), Mar was eventually persuaded to lead his full army south, on 10 November.
Spies informed Argyll of Mar’s actions, and he moved his army of about 4,000 to Sheriffmuir, near Dunblane.
The two armies met on the battlefield on 13 November 1715.

The Battle was the subject of “The Battle of Sherramuir”, one of the most famous songs written by Robert Burns .
The song was written when Burns toured the Highlands in 1787 and was first published in The Scots Musical Museum, appearing in volume III, 1790.
It was written to be sung to the “Cameronian Rant”.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot
@MacMurchiePipes
@ScottishTailor
@GolfScotland18

Loch Achtriochtan


Loch Achtriochtan or Loch Trychardan is a Scottish loch located to the east of Glencoe village in the Scottish Highlands.
During the 18th century the loch flooded and nearby inhabitants had to abandon the area.
Now under the care of the National Trust for Scotland, Loch Achtriochtan is a small fresh water lochan in Glencoe, fed by the River Coe, which eventually flows into Loch Leven at Invercoe.
To the south of the Loch is Achnambeithach Cottage, accessible from the A82 road.
To the north, there are the mountains Sgorr nam Fiannaidh and Stob Coire Leith and, to the south, the Three Sisters. Loch Actriochtan sits about three miles from Glencoe village.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Red Castle of Lunan


Red Castle of Lunan is a ruined fortified house on the coast of Angus. It is about 4 miles (6.4 km) south-southwest of Montrose.

The earliest structure on the site was built for King William the Lion in the late twelfth century to repel Viking invasions to Lunan Bay. Evidence shows, however, that William took up residence there on several occasions whilst on hunting expeditions. In 1194, William conferred the castle, and land surrounding the village of Inverkeilor, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) east of the castle, to Walter de Berkely, the Royal Chamberlain. On his death, his lands of Inverkeilor, with the castle, passed to Ingram de Balliol who had married the heiress of Walter. He rebuilt the castle and the property remained in that family for two generations. When his grandson, Ingram, who flourished between 1280-84, died childless about 1305 the property passed to the son of Constance de Baliol, Henry de Fishburn.

The property was forfeit during the reallocation by Robert the Bruce who in 1328 gave the castle to the Earl of Ross. The castle is referred to as rubeum castrum (Latin for Red Castle) in deeds of 1286, referring to its burnished red sandstone, typical of this area.

In 1579, James, son of Lord Gray, married Lady Elizabeth Beaton, who owned the castle, and fell in love with her daughter. After Lady Beaton threw him out, Gray (with his brother Andrew of Dunninald) laid siege to the castle for two years, ultimately burning the inhabitants out. From then on the castle slipped into decline, and, although it remained partially roofed until 1770, it was never again a residence of nobility. Its last inhabitant was the minister of Inverkeilor, one James Rait.

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Wild Scotland


Filmmaker John Duncan flew a drone to capture Scotland’s incredible wilderness in this aerial video. Taking you across the country to sites like the Highlands and Islands on the west coast and John O’Groats and North Berwick on the east, experience some of the region’s most beautiful scenery.

Embedded Credit : John Duncan Film and BBC
 
Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Have a swim at Ardnamurchan


As a wild swimming enthusiast, Calum is always going to suggest a dip isn’t he?

He says there are great waves at Sanna beach on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, the most westerly point of Scotland’s mainland.

Ardnamurchan fan Graham Speirs recommends sticking to the land though, saying ‘often the best thing is simply to stride out of your house or hotel and just start walking’.

 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Three Stunning Scottish Road Trips


Scottish road trips offer amazing views but what is there to do when you get out of the car?

The North Coast 500 has been hailed as a tremendous success by the Highland tourist industry. While Kate from Love from Scotland is a big fan, she thinks there are some other great Scottish road trips to consider.
Sometimes though it’s good to stretch your legs. So here are three suggestions of things to try on when you’re on the road.


Embedded Credit : BBC and Love From Scotland
@_smidge and @BBCScotland
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Scolpaig Tower


Scolpaig Tower (also known as Dùn Scolpaig or MacLeod’s Folly) is a Georgian folly located near the village of Scolpaig on the Isle of North Uist.
The name probably derives from the Old Norse scolpvik, or ‘Scolp Bay’ (a scolp being a large Hebridean vessel, probably relating to the nearby bay where such boats may have landed).

It was built in about 1830 by Dr Alexander MacLeod, who was the factor of the North Uist estate.
It was erected to provide employment for the purpose of famine relief.
Built over an Iron Age dun on a small islet in Loch Scolpaig, the Gothic-style folly has an octagonal footprint and appears as a two-storey structure surmounted by a crenellated parapet.
The tower is surrounded by a low stone wall that was probably constructed at the same time.
The original dun has disappeared entirely. Today the tower is open to the elements and serves as a nesting place for birds.

It was included in the Ninth Report and Inventory of Monuments and Constructions in the Outer Hebrides, Skye and the Small Isles (1928) of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland,
and Historic Scotland approved it as a Category B listed building in 1971.

When the water level is sufficiently low, it can be reached via a stone causeway in Loch Scolpaig.
The tower is a prominent feature on otherwise flat ground and is among the most photographed sites on the island.

A group organised by the Council for Scottish Archaeology under its Adopt-a-Monument scheme was in 2008 attempting to raise funds to stabilise and conserve the structure.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Fortingall Yew


It is claimed that Pontius Pilate was born (and is buried) near to the village of Fortingall, which lies by the mouth of Glen Lyon.

An early version of this legend appears in the medieval chronicles of Raphael Holinshead.

One common telling of the tale claims that Pilate’s father, a high-ranking Roman diplomat was sent to Scotland to negotiate a treaty with the Pictish leader, Metallanus.

During these lengthy talks, Pilate’s father married a local woman who bore him a son.

An embellishment of the legend has Pilate playing under the ancient yew tree, which is located in the churchyard at Fortingall.

At its peak in the eighteenth century, the ‘Fortingall Yew’ had a girth of 17m. Today it is a shadow of its former self, having been damaged in the past by fire. Nevertheless, at an estimated 3000 to 7000 years of age, this evergreen tree is the oldest living thing in Europe.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny