Battle of Glen Trool


The Battle of Glen Trool was a minor engagement in the Scottish Wars of Independence, fought in April 1307. Glen Trool is a narrow glen in the Southern Uplands of Galloway. Loch Trool is aligned on an east-west axis and is flanked on both sides by steep rising hills, making it ideal for an ambush. The battlefield is currently under research to be inventoried and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009.

Robert Bruce had been involved in the murder of John “the Red” Comyn, a leading rival, and one of the most powerful men in Scotland, the previous year 1306. This led to a bitter civil war between the Bruce’s faction and the Comyns and their allies, notably Edward I.

Bruce’s Stone is a large granite boulder commemorating Bruce‚Äôs victory in 1307. It is at the top of the hill on the north side of Loch Trool. In 1929 on the 600th anniversary of Bruce’s death, it was placed high above the northern shore of Loch Trool from where legend has it that he had commanded the ambush which took place on the Steps of Trool on the other side of the loch. It also serves as a starting spot for the challenging walk up Merrick (2764 feet), the highest mountain in southern Scotland.

IN LOYAL REMEMBRANCE
OF
ROBERT THE BRUCE
KING OF SCOTS
WHOSE VICTORY IN THIS
GLEN OVER AN ENGLISH
FORCE IN MARCH 1307
OPENED THE CAMPAIGN OF
INDEPENDENCE WHICH HE
BROUGHT TO A DECISIVE
CLOSE AT BANNOCKBURN
ON 24th JUNE 1314.

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
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Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

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