Category Archives: Cairngorms, Aberdeen and Tayside

Rannoch Moor.


Rannoch Moor is an expanse of boggy moorland to the west of Loch Rannoch, where it extends from and into westerly Perth and Kinross.
Rannoch Moor is designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Special Area of Conservation.

It is notable for its wildlife, and is particularly famous as being the sole British location for the Rannoch-rush, named after the moor.
It was frequently visited by Horace Donisthorpe who collected many unusual species of ants on the moor and surrounding hilly ground.
Today it is still one of the few remaining habitats for Formica exsecta, the “narrow-headed ant”, although recent surveys have failed to produce any sign of Formica pratensis,
which Donisthorpe recorded in the area in the early part of the 20th century.

Peat deposits pose major difficulties to builders of roads and railways.
When the West Highland Line was built across Rannoch Moor, its builders had to float the tracks on a mattress of tree roots, brushwood and thousands of tons of earth and ashes.
Corrour railway station, the UK’s highest, and one of its most remote being 10 miles from the nearest public road, is located on this section of the line at 1,339 feet.
The line takes gentle curves totalling 23 miles across the moorland. The A82 road crosses western Rannoch Moor on its way to Glen Coe and Fort William.

The desolate and isolated Gorton was a private railway station built near Meall a Ghortain that once housed a school for local railway workers children and still serves as the Gorton Crossing engineers siding.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot
@MacMurchiePipes
@ScottishTailor
@GolfScotland18

Red Castle of Lunan


Red Castle of Lunan is a ruined fortified house on the coast of Angus. It is about 4 miles (6.4 km) south-southwest of Montrose.

The earliest structure on the site was built for King William the Lion in the late twelfth century to repel Viking invasions to Lunan Bay. Evidence shows, however, that William took up residence there on several occasions whilst on hunting expeditions. In 1194, William conferred the castle, and land surrounding the village of Inverkeilor, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) east of the castle, to Walter de Berkely, the Royal Chamberlain. On his death, his lands of Inverkeilor, with the castle, passed to Ingram de Balliol who had married the heiress of Walter. He rebuilt the castle and the property remained in that family for two generations. When his grandson, Ingram, who flourished between 1280-84, died childless about 1305 the property passed to the son of Constance de Baliol, Henry de Fishburn.

The property was forfeit during the reallocation by Robert the Bruce who in 1328 gave the castle to the Earl of Ross. The castle is referred to as rubeum castrum (Latin for Red Castle) in deeds of 1286, referring to its burnished red sandstone, typical of this area.

In 1579, James, son of Lord Gray, married Lady Elizabeth Beaton, who owned the castle, and fell in love with her daughter. After Lady Beaton threw him out, Gray (with his brother Andrew of Dunninald) laid siege to the castle for two years, ultimately burning the inhabitants out. From then on the castle slipped into decline, and, although it remained partially roofed until 1770, it was never again a residence of nobility. Its last inhabitant was the minister of Inverkeilor, one James Rait.

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Fortingall Yew


It is claimed that Pontius Pilate was born (and is buried) near to the village of Fortingall, which lies by the mouth of Glen Lyon.

An early version of this legend appears in the medieval chronicles of Raphael Holinshead.

One common telling of the tale claims that Pilate’s father, a high-ranking Roman diplomat was sent to Scotland to negotiate a treaty with the Pictish leader, Metallanus.

During these lengthy talks, Pilate’s father married a local woman who bore him a son.

An embellishment of the legend has Pilate playing under the ancient yew tree, which is located in the churchyard at Fortingall.

At its peak in the eighteenth century, the ‘Fortingall Yew’ had a girth of 17m. Today it is a shadow of its former self, having been damaged in the past by fire. Nevertheless, at an estimated 3000 to 7000 years of age, this evergreen tree is the oldest living thing in Europe.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Cairngorms National Park Glen Tanar


Set of the eastern edge of Scotland’s spectacular Cairngorms National Park Glen Tanar spans 25,000 of breathtaking Highland scenery. From rugged heather moorland to towering Caledonian pine forests to the majestic River Dee. This is a destination for exploring the best of natural Scotland.

 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Carrbridge


Carrbridge is a village in Badenoch and Strathspey.
It lies off the A9 road on the A938 road, west of Skye of Curr, southeast of Findhom Bridge, near Bogroy.
It has the oldest stone bridge in the Highlands and the nearby ancient pine forest contains the Landmark Forest Adventure Park.

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Invermoriston


Invermoriston is a small village 11 kilometres (7 miles) north of Fort Augustus.
The village is on the A82 road, at a junction with the A887.
The village’s most visited attraction is the Thomas Telford bridge, built in 1813, which crosses the spectacular River Moriston falls.
This bridge used to form part of the main road between Drumnadrochit and Fort Augustus but was replaced in the 1930s with the new bridge used today.

Invermoriston’s attractions include a hotel (Glenmoriston Arms) , village shop, clog and craft shop as well as a coffee shop/restaurant.
From the top of the hill above the village, Sròn Na Muic (Scottish Gaelic for “The Nose of the Pig”), one can admire the finest views of the Great Glen.

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Loch an Eilean


Loch an Eilein is a small irregular shaped, freshwater loch in the Rothiemurchus Forest about 5 km (3.1 mi) south of Aviemore.
Loch an Eilein comes from the Scottish Gaelic and means ‘Loch of the island’. The loch is considered to be beautiful and walks around it are popular.

In the late 18th and early 19th century, the loch was used mainly for two things.
On the banks of the loch there is a limestone kiln where the lime stone was collected from a rockface looking over the loch.
Also loggers used the connecting river to float logs down to the wood-treating factories downstream.
Rob Roy and other cattle rustlers used the loch, and one side of the loch is called ‘Robbers Way’.
There are only three remaining houses on the loch side, which are now used by forestry officers.

In the middle of the Loch, on what may be a natural island, are the ruins of a small 15th century castle.
The castle is said to have once been the property of Alexander Stewart the Wolf of Badenoch.
The Jacobites, retreating from Cromdale in 1690, besieged the castle, which was held by Dame Grizel Mor Grant, widow of the fifth laird Grant.
At this time the castle was connected to the shore by a causeway. The causeway was lost when the water level in the loch was raised in the 18th century.

The loch and the forest around it are popular with birdwatchers, walkers, mountain bikers and day-trippers.
Among the birds found on or around Loch an Eilein are the crested tit, redstart, spotted flycatcher, tree pipit, red-throated diver, common sandpiper, whinchat, and the occasional merlin.
 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Crovie


Crovie is a small village in Aberdeenshire, dating from a time when the sea was the only mode of transport to and from Scotland’s shores.
It comprises a single row of houses. Unlike the similar neighbouring village, Pennan, Crovie is situated on such a narrow ledge that any cars have to be left at the south of the village.
A footpath along the shore to the west leads to neighbouring village Gardenstown.

Crovie was established by families (crofters) who had been moved off the land to make room for the landlord’s sheep.
Here, they operated fishing boats for the landlord and gradually acquired their own craft instead.
The fishing industry declined in the 20th century before ceasing altogether with the storm of 1953, which washed away a number of structures and forced the residents to flee.
Since then most of the buildings have been turned into holiday lets.

 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Monzie Castle

Monzie Castle

The oldest part of the castle dates from 1634. The main part was completed in 1795 by Robert Paterson, previously clerk of works to the celebrated Robert Adam. In 1908 a serious fire took hold of the castle with only the outside walls remaining. The leading Scottish architect of the day, Sir Robert Lorimer was instructed to restore the castle. His lifelong affinity with traditional Scottish architecture saw him encourage and develop a number of Edinburgh craftsmen and workshops, whose work is on display as part of a harmonious piece of design.

Castle opening times

15th May 2016 until 14th June 2016 from 2pm to 4pm

Entry fee £5

Guests who stay in our holiday cottages for a week or more receive a complimentary tour (subject to availability)

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny

Dunnottar Castle

Dunnottar Castle
Dunnottar Castle
Dunnottar Castle is a ruined medieval fortress located upon a rocky headland on the north-east coast of Scotland, about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) south of Stonehaven. The surviving buildings are largely of the 15th and 16th centuries, but the site is believed to have been fortified in the Early Middle Ages. Dunnottar has played a prominent role in the history of Scotland through to the 18th-century Jacobite risings because of its strategic location and defensive strength. Dunnottar is best known as the place where the Honours of Scotland, the Scottish crown jewels, were hidden from Oliver Cromwell’s invading army in the 17th century. The property of the Keiths from the 14th century, and the seat of the Earl Marischal, Dunnottar declined after the last Earl forfeited his titles by taking part in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. The castle was restored in the 20th century and is now open to the public.

 

Scottish Blue Badge Guide – Piping Scot Tours.
Golf Tours – Faraway Fairways Ltd.
Tartan and Kilts – Andrew Brookes Tailoring.
Bagpipes – Blue MacMurchie.

Please like our Facebook Page.

Follow us on TWITTER.

@PipingScot @MacMurchiePipes @ScottishTailor @GolfScotland18
@Dingwall_Jenny