Oban


Oban is a resort town within the Argyll and Bute council area of Scotland.
Despite its small size, it is the largest town between Helensburgh and Fort William.
During the tourist season, the town can play host to up to 25,000 people. Oban occupies a setting in the Firth of Lorn.
The bay is a near perfect horseshoe, protected by the island of Kerrera; and beyond Kerrera, the Isle of Mull.
To the north, is the long low island of Lismore, and the mountains of Morvern and Ardgour.
 
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Glen Lyon


Glen Lyon is a glen in the Perth and Kinross region of Scotland.
It is the longest enclosed glen in Scotland and runs for 34 miles from Loch Lyon in the west to the village of Fortingall in the east.
This glen was also known as “An Crom Ghleann”, (the bent glen).
The land given over to the MacGregors was Scottish Gaelic: An Tòiseachd.
 
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Invermorison


Invermoriston is a small village 11 kilometres (7 miles) north of Fort Augustus.
The village is on the A82 road, at a junction with the A887.
The village’s most visited attraction is the Thomas Telford bridge, built in 1813, which crosses the spectacular River Moriston falls.
This bridge used to form part of the main road between Drumnadrochit and Fort Augustus but was replaced in the 1930s with the new bridge used today.

Invermoriston’s attractions include a hotel (Glenmoriston Arms) , village shop, clog and craft shop as well as a coffee shop/restaurant.
From the top of the hill above the village, Sròn Na Muic (Scottish Gaelic for “The Nose of the Pig”), one can admire the finest views of the Great Glen.

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Loch an Eilean


Loch an Eilein is a small irregular shaped, freshwater loch in the Rothiemurchus Forest about 5 km (3.1 mi) south of Aviemore.
Loch an Eilein comes from the Scottish Gaelic and means ‘Loch of the island’. The loch is considered to be beautiful and walks around it are popular.

In the late 18th and early 19th century, the loch was used mainly for two things.
On the banks of the loch there is a limestone kiln where the lime stone was collected from a rockface looking over the loch.
Also loggers used the connecting river to float logs down to the wood-treating factories downstream.
Rob Roy and other cattle rustlers used the loch, and one side of the loch is called ‘Robbers Way’.
There are only three remaining houses on the loch side, which are now used by forestry officers.

In the middle of the Loch, on what may be a natural island, are the ruins of a small 15th century castle.
The castle is said to have once been the property of Alexander Stewart the Wolf of Badenoch.
The Jacobites, retreating from Cromdale in 1690, besieged the castle, which was held by Dame Grizel Mor Grant, widow of the fifth laird Grant.
At this time the castle was connected to the shore by a causeway. The causeway was lost when the water level in the loch was raised in the 18th century.

The loch and the forest around it are popular with birdwatchers, walkers, mountain bikers and day-trippers.
Among the birds found on or around Loch an Eilein are the crested tit, redstart, spotted flycatcher, tree pipit, red-throated diver, common sandpiper, whinchat, and the occasional merlin.
 

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Buachaille Etive Mor


Buachaille Etive Mòr, generally known to climbers simply as The Buachaille, is a mountain at the head of Glen Etive.
Its pyramidal form, as seen from the A82 road when travelling towards Glen Coe, makes it one of the most recognisable mountains in Scotland, and one of the most depicted on postcards and calendars.

Buachaille Etive Mòr takes the form of a ridge nearly five miles (8 km) in length, almost entirely encircled by the River Etive and its tributaries.
The ridge contains four principal tops: from north-east to south-west these are Stob Dearg (1022 m), Stob na Doire (1011 m), Stob Coire Altruim (941 m) and Stob na Bròige (956 m). Stob Dearg and Stob na Bròige are both Munros; the latter was promoted to Munro status by the Scottish Mountaineering Club in 1997.

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North Coast 500


The North Coast 500 Route Scotland, circles around Scotland’s top north highlands has always been there, but never received a name, until 2014. Today this amazing itinerary moved in the limelight, and was nicknamed Scotland’s Route 66.

Some say Scotland’s North Coast 500 route the most scenic road trip on the planet. Well, there’s no doubt that it’s among worlds’ most beautiful coastal drives… We we’re truly blown away by it’s most epic scenery, ancient ruins, castles and beaches that beat the Maldives (except for the temperature) and not to forget about the friendly people and a strong culture to explore. In short .. you won’t be sorry to plan your trip right now.
We can say it is one the most beautiful places we have ever encountered.
If you want to take it easy and spend time at every attraction, you’ll need 7 days and a cheap car rental, and that’s all it will take to experience a whole new world
Film and edit: Caspar Daniël Diederik
Protagonist: Enza di Lecce
storytravelers.com
Powered by VisitBritain & VisitScotland
Sponsored by the Social Travel Summit and ambassador initiative
Find more at:
visitbritain.com
visitscotland.com


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Crovie


Crovie is a small village in Aberdeenshire, dating from a time when the sea was the only mode of transport to and from Scotland’s shores.
It comprises a single row of houses. Unlike the similar neighbouring village, Pennan, Crovie is situated on such a narrow ledge that any cars have to be left at the south of the village.
A footpath along the shore to the west leads to neighbouring village Gardenstown.

Crovie was established by families (crofters) who had been moved off the land to make room for the landlord’s sheep.
Here, they operated fishing boats for the landlord and gradually acquired their own craft instead.
The fishing industry declined in the 20th century before ceasing altogether with the storm of 1953, which washed away a number of structures and forced the residents to flee.
Since then most of the buildings have been turned into holiday lets.

 

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Loch Leven


Loch Leven is a sea loch on the west coast of Scotland.
Loch Leven extends 8 3⁄4 miles (14.1 km), varying in width between 220 yards (200 m) and just over 1 mile (1.6 km).
It opens onto Camus a’ Chois at North Ballachulish, part of Loch Linnhe at its western end.
There are nine small islands, some rocky and covered with heather and some just smooth green grass, near the western end of the loch.

The village of Glencoe lies on its southern shore.
The burial place of the MacDonald clan of Glencoe lies on an island – Eilean Munde, St.Munda’s or St Munn’s or Saint Fintan Munnu’s Island, opposite the village.
The island burial place was also shared by the Camerons of Callart, on the north shore of the loch, the Stewarts of Ballachulish and Appin and other local families.

The village of Kinlochleven at the head of the loch was established when the aluminium smelter was built there during the first decade of the twentieth century.
It was originally the hamlets of Kinlochmore (Inverness-shire) and Kinlochbeg (Argyll) either side of the River Leven.
It lies on the road north to Fort William (Scottish Gaelic: An Gearasdan Inbhir-Lochaidh, built in 1927, which followed the shores of the loch,
but a bridge was built across the mouth of the loch at Ballachulish in 1975 to replace the Ballachulish Ferry.

Under the Ballachulish Bridge, at the entrance to the loch, is the narrows Caolas Mhic Phàdraig.
The settlements either side are North and South Ballachulish – Baile a’ Chaolais (the settlement on the narrows).
There is a fast tidal stream through the narrows, running at up to seven knots at springs; it is wise, therefore, to time any passage through the narrows with the tides.
Further up the loch, there are several other narrows – principally Caolas na Con – with significant, but diminishing tidal streams.
The loch is navigable as far as Kinlochleven, and was used by ships bringing alumina to the smelter there until its closure.
 

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Ardtoe


Ardtoe Beach is a lovely sandy beach, great for rockpooling, swimming and birdwatching. The beach is a popular spot for locals and tourists alike in Ardnamurchan and is particulary beautiful at low tide with great views to The Small Isles.

The single track road to Ardtoe, from the A861 near Acharacle, passes over Kentra Moss and skirts around Kentra Bay providing a scenic drive to this lovely beach. There is a small car park near the beach with a small parking charge.

Just one of the many lovely sandy beaches on The West Coast of Scotland.
 

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Glen Torridon


Glen Torridon is in the Northwest Highlands.
However the name is also applied to the area surrounding the village, particularly the Torridon Hills, mountains to the north of Glen Torridon.
 
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