Innis Chonaill


Innis Chonaill is an island in Loch Awe. It is part of Kilchrenan and Dalavich parish, in Argyll.
The island is fourteen miles east of Kilmartin, Argyll.

The castle that stands on the wooded island of Innis Chonaill has thick outer walls.
It was the original stronghold of the Clan Campbell from possibly the eleventh century or earlier.
It was the seat of Cailean Mór (Sir Colin Campbell) who was killed fighting the Clan MacDougall at the Battle of Red Ford in 1296.
Later John MacDougall held the castle against Robert the Bruce in 1308.
Sir Colin Campbell’s son, Sir Neil Campbell, married Bruce’s sister, Mary, and Sir Neil fought for the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314.
Innis Chonaill Castle was abandoned by the Campbells as their residence in the fifteenth century, but it was still used as a prison.
The young Domhnall Dubh (“Black Donald”), son of Aonghas Óg (Angus) and heir to the Lordship of the Isles,
was imprisoned in the castle after the Battle of Bloody Bay, which took place off the coast of the Isle of Mull in 1484.
He escaped but after invading Badenoch in 1503 he was recaptured and imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle for forty years.
Innis Chonaill Castle was ruinous by the nineteenth century.
 

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Transport Scotland


Scottish Transport can deploy over 173 gritting vehicles in heavy snow conditions, but not all of these are named. Many are just shown on the interactive map by their number plates.

Some have also been given less interesting names, like Jack, Fred and the oh-so-original Gritter.

The gritters have been busy over the past few weeks. Glasgow saw the biggest snowfall in the UK overnight on Thursday, with more than 10cm recorded in Bishopton – forcing the city’s airport, one of Scotland’s busiest, to temporarily suspend flights.

The latest snowfall to hit the UK comes around a fortnight after hundreds of schools were closed, homes were left without power, and travellers were stranded or forced to stay indoors when a deep freeze gripped the UK.

TRACK THE ROAD GRITTER

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Battle of Glen Trool


The Battle of Glen Trool was a minor engagement in the Scottish Wars of Independence, fought in April 1307. Glen Trool is a narrow glen in the Southern Uplands of Galloway. Loch Trool is aligned on an east-west axis and is flanked on both sides by steep rising hills, making it ideal for an ambush. The battlefield is currently under research to be inventoried and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009.

Robert Bruce had been involved in the murder of John “the Red” Comyn, a leading rival, and one of the most powerful men in Scotland, the previous year 1306. This led to a bitter civil war between the Bruce’s faction and the Comyns and their allies, notably Edward I.

Bruce’s Stone is a large granite boulder commemorating Bruce’s victory in 1307. It is at the top of the hill on the north side of Loch Trool. In 1929 on the 600th anniversary of Bruce’s death, it was placed high above the northern shore of Loch Trool from where legend has it that he had commanded the ambush which took place on the Steps of Trool on the other side of the loch. It also serves as a starting spot for the challenging walk up Merrick (2764 feet), the highest mountain in southern Scotland.

IN LOYAL REMEMBRANCE
OF
ROBERT THE BRUCE
KING OF SCOTS
WHOSE VICTORY IN THIS
GLEN OVER AN ENGLISH
FORCE IN MARCH 1307
OPENED THE CAMPAIGN OF
INDEPENDENCE WHICH HE
BROUGHT TO A DECISIVE
CLOSE AT BANNOCKBURN
ON 24th JUNE 1314.

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Rannoch Moor.


Rannoch Moor is an expanse of boggy moorland to the west of Loch Rannoch, where it extends from and into westerly Perth and Kinross.
Rannoch Moor is designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Special Area of Conservation.

It is notable for its wildlife, and is particularly famous as being the sole British location for the Rannoch-rush, named after the moor.
It was frequently visited by Horace Donisthorpe who collected many unusual species of ants on the moor and surrounding hilly ground.
Today it is still one of the few remaining habitats for Formica exsecta, the “narrow-headed ant”, although recent surveys have failed to produce any sign of Formica pratensis,
which Donisthorpe recorded in the area in the early part of the 20th century.

Peat deposits pose major difficulties to builders of roads and railways.
When the West Highland Line was built across Rannoch Moor, its builders had to float the tracks on a mattress of tree roots, brushwood and thousands of tons of earth and ashes.
Corrour railway station, the UK’s highest, and one of its most remote being 10 miles from the nearest public road, is located on this section of the line at 1,339 feet.
The line takes gentle curves totalling 23 miles across the moorland. The A82 road crosses western Rannoch Moor on its way to Glen Coe and Fort William.

The desolate and isolated Gorton was a private railway station built near Meall a Ghortain that once housed a school for local railway workers children and still serves as the Gorton Crossing engineers siding.
 

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Scottish Tourist Event of the Year 2017.

Voting for the Scottish Tourist Event of the Year 2017 in now open.

Scottish Tourists and Visitors will be able to choose their winner from the shortlist of Scottish Events, which will be revealed on the Scottish Tourist website.

Best Scottish Tourist Event 2017

View Results

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Sheriffmuir


The Battle of Sheriffmuir was an engagement in 1715 at the height of the Jacobite rising in England and Scotland.
The battlefield has been included in the Inventory of Historic Battlefields in Scotland and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009.
Sheriffmuir was and is a remote elevated plateau of heathland lying between Stirling and Auchterarder on the north fringe of the Ochil Hills.

John Erskine, 6th Earl of Mar, standard-bearer for the Jacobite cause in Scotland, mustered Highland chiefs, and on 6 September declared James Francis Edward Stuart (the “Old Pretender”) as King of Scots.
With an army of about 12,000 men Mar proceeded to take Perth, and commanded much of the northern Highlands.
Following unsuccessful skirmishes against John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll (based at Stirling), Mar was eventually persuaded to lead his full army south, on 10 November.
Spies informed Argyll of Mar’s actions, and he moved his army of about 4,000 to Sheriffmuir, near Dunblane.
The two armies met on the battlefield on 13 November 1715.

The Battle was the subject of “The Battle of Sherramuir”, one of the most famous songs written by Robert Burns .
The song was written when Burns toured the Highlands in 1787 and was first published in The Scots Musical Museum, appearing in volume III, 1790.
It was written to be sung to the “Cameronian Rant”.
 

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Loch Achtriochtan


Loch Achtriochtan or Loch Trychardan is a Scottish loch located to the east of Glencoe village in the Scottish Highlands.
During the 18th century the loch flooded and nearby inhabitants had to abandon the area.
Now under the care of the National Trust for Scotland, Loch Achtriochtan is a small fresh water lochan in Glencoe, fed by the River Coe, which eventually flows into Loch Leven at Invercoe.
To the south of the Loch is Achnambeithach Cottage, accessible from the A82 road.
To the north, there are the mountains Sgorr nam Fiannaidh and Stob Coire Leith and, to the south, the Three Sisters. Loch Actriochtan sits about three miles from Glencoe village.
 

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Red Castle of Lunan


Red Castle of Lunan is a ruined fortified house on the coast of Angus. It is about 4 miles (6.4 km) south-southwest of Montrose.

The earliest structure on the site was built for King William the Lion in the late twelfth century to repel Viking invasions to Lunan Bay. Evidence shows, however, that William took up residence there on several occasions whilst on hunting expeditions. In 1194, William conferred the castle, and land surrounding the village of Inverkeilor, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) east of the castle, to Walter de Berkely, the Royal Chamberlain. On his death, his lands of Inverkeilor, with the castle, passed to Ingram de Balliol who had married the heiress of Walter. He rebuilt the castle and the property remained in that family for two generations. When his grandson, Ingram, who flourished between 1280-84, died childless about 1305 the property passed to the son of Constance de Baliol, Henry de Fishburn.

The property was forfeit during the reallocation by Robert the Bruce who in 1328 gave the castle to the Earl of Ross. The castle is referred to as rubeum castrum (Latin for Red Castle) in deeds of 1286, referring to its burnished red sandstone, typical of this area.

In 1579, James, son of Lord Gray, married Lady Elizabeth Beaton, who owned the castle, and fell in love with her daughter. After Lady Beaton threw him out, Gray (with his brother Andrew of Dunninald) laid siege to the castle for two years, ultimately burning the inhabitants out. From then on the castle slipped into decline, and, although it remained partially roofed until 1770, it was never again a residence of nobility. Its last inhabitant was the minister of Inverkeilor, one James Rait.

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Wild Scotland


Filmmaker John Duncan flew a drone to capture Scotland’s incredible wilderness in this aerial video. Taking you across the country to sites like the Highlands and Islands on the west coast and John O’Groats and North Berwick on the east, experience some of the region’s most beautiful scenery.

Embedded Credit : John Duncan Film and BBC
 
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Have a swim at Ardnamurchan


As a wild swimming enthusiast, Calum is always going to suggest a dip isn’t he?

He says there are great waves at Sanna beach on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, the most westerly point of Scotland’s mainland.

Ardnamurchan fan Graham Speirs recommends sticking to the land though, saying ‘often the best thing is simply to stride out of your house or hotel and just start walking’.

 

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